AJS began training community auditors in 2016, and thanks to the tireless work of volunteers like Keybi, have already seen measurable change in the public schools and health centers where they work.

 

"What has also struck me about [AJS] is their imagination: they imagine new ways of prodding and assisting the government to do what it should be doing, new ways of standing alongside victims," wrote philosopher Nicholas Wolterstorff after one of his visits to Honduras to observe the work of AJS.

cycling ceremony

Orar. Soñar. Trabajar. Pray. Dream. Work.

– motto of Transformemos Honduras

“Six years ago, we had a crazy idea,” says Kurt Ver Beek, vice president of the Association for a More Just Society (AJS). It’s true, the goal of a cross-country bike race to raise awareness about corruption in public education was ambitious, even a little crazy, but no less so than the idea to reform the education system in the first place. Crazy ideas – converted into system-changing realities – are the cornerstone of AJS’s work.

kurt-giving-talk

Watch recording of Kurt's talk during Calvin College's prestigious lecture series.

2014 was a year like no other for AJS

Once again, the payoff from AJS's work in fighting corruption in the education system has been reinforced with study results — this time from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

“I am a product of the public education system. I know it can work!” says Honduran Education Minister Marlon Escoto (pictured second to right). Unfortunately for more than a decade, the Honduran education system was not working. While Honduras spent the highest percentage of its GDP in the region on education, its students had some of the lowest test scores.

For the first time in more than a decade, Honduran children and teachers complete a school year. 

When Francisco Monroy, a pastor, saw the desperate state of the Honduran public education system, he wanted to do something, but didn’t know what. AJS-supported Let's Transform Honduras provided an answer. 

For the first time, civil society, represented through AJS's Transformemos Honduras, is incorporated as a major player in teacher strikes, providing an opportunity for transformation.

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From the Justice Journal

The New York Times published an opinion piece by Sonia Nazario, Pulitzer Prize winning author and also our good friend, about the problems facing Honduras. For those of us who love Honduras, it is not an easy read - but we have seen change and we remain hopeful.