Last week Danish author Jonatan Larsen released an English translation of the book as "Piece of a Volunteer," an e-book on Amazon. The book was inspired by his visit to Honduras and the story of Dionisio Diaz Garcia.

An “on-the-ground” perspective from Honduras’ leading civil society organization working on matters of anti-corruption and citizen security

Honduras Frontline Report

Even as we feel that what we do won´t make much difference, it does. I see it in the faces of people who, after hearing our stories, feel that there really is hope for Honduras. Then together, we can leap from hope into action.

Mari has worked as a cleaning woman her whole life, jumping from contract to contract, and feels that every time she changes companies, her conditions get worse. After six months in this new job, the lateness of the paycheck worries her. But she doesn’t even think of looking for other work. “At my age, no one wants to give me work,” she says, looking down at her hands.

Every afternoon at 5pm, Suyapa puts on the same threadbare uniform that she bought two and a half years ago (she can’t afford the $20 they would charge her to replace it). She puts on the shoes that are cracked and ruined. She readies her things and steps onto the bus, hoping that today will be the day that she’s paid what she’s owed, but read to come home again with empty hands. 

Érika works 71 hours per week. Last month she took home $208. “It’s hard sometimes,” she says, “but there really isn’t any other choice."

Cleaning and security companies in Honduras are notorious for not respecting the rights of their workers. Despite contracts with major state institutions, most get away with paying their workers less than the legal minimum wage, and working them as many as 96 hours per week without any extra pay or overtime. AJS has put together a study of the current state of security guards and cleaning women in state institutions in Honduras, pressuring the government to guarantee the labor rights of these workers.

If you go to live in other lands,
Tell them truly what happens here.
Tell them that hatred and misery
Have not been able to bring us to our knees.

What do we mean when we say that we have HOPE for Honduras? Over the next few weeks, we will be exploring what it means to have hope in the face of difficulties, looking at the words and reflection of staff who are devoting their lives to peace and justice in Honduras. We can point to encouraging numbers, stories, and statistics, but the real reason for our hope lies deeper -- we are serving the God of Hope who we trust to bless our work. Follow these updates and stories to learn more about what gives us hope!

stories of hope

Prayers of Thanksgiving for the hope that we have

pray with us!

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From the Justice Journal

"How to Solve a Murder in Honduras," a special series from AJS that tells the story of how criminal investigators, lawyers, police officers, psychologists, information analysts, and victims are working together to end violence in Honduras.

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Association for a More Just Society (AJS)
PO Box 888631
Grand Rapids, MI 49588

info@ajs-us.org

1 (800) 897-1135