Category: Systems

An AJS Throwback: Fighting for Justice with Afro-Honduran Communities

  • February 26, 2019

In 1998, AJS-Honduras was founded by a group of Honduran and North American friends (including Kurt Ver Beek and Jo Van Engen) dedicated to doing justice in Honduras. We’re excited to share a throwback to the 1990s, when we worked with the Garifuna community of Ruguma to protect their lands from theft.



Three Questions of Civil Society: What, Why, and How

  • March 20, 2018

AJS-Honduras director Carlos Hernández graces another newspaper front page, the headline calling him a representative, not just of AJS-Honduras, but of Honduran “Civil Society”. But what exactly does that mean?



U.S. Lawyers Contribute to Systemic Change

  • May 19, 2017

“AJS is in such an interesting position where they are able to both criticize and support. They critique, but then turn around and say ‘our intention is to lift you up and help you to better.”



AJS Presents Report on Honduras’ Superior Auditing Court

  • April 5, 2017

According to a definitive report into Honduras’ Superior Auditing Court, published by AJS this March: “These corruption scandals and institutional crises could have been prevented, detected, and corrected if there were an independent Superior Auditing Court with sufficient budget and capacity…”



AJS Trains Citizens to Navigate the Judicial Process

  • October 27, 2016

In Honduras, violent crimes often go unreported because of fear of retaliation, because of a lack of trust in the judicial system, but also because the system is complicated, intimidating, and difficult to understand. Security 101 teaches leaders of civil society both how to reduce their risks for crime and what to do if crimes do happen. They are taught to navigate the current judicial system, but also to observe it and mobilize people to pressure the government to be more effective.



“Total Access” for AJS

  • January 30, 2014

A few weeks ago, Honduras’ new President signed a letter of intent promising AJS “total access” to five government offices to make sure the new government is acting transparently.



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